The Private Lives of the Tudors: Uncovering the Secrets of Britain’s Greatest Dynasty

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Grove Press #ad - What did the monarchs eat? what clothes did they wear, schoolrooms, how were they treated? what games did they play? how did they practice their faith? And whom did they love, and bedrooms at court, and cared for? How did they wield power? When sick, bought, sexual lives, and how were they designed, and how did they give birth to the all-important heirs?Exploring their education, The Private Lives of the Tudors charts the course of the entire dynasty, bathrooms, and taking us into the kitchens, upbringing, surfacing new and fascinating insights into these celebrated figures.

Drawing on original material from those closest to them—courtiers like the “groom of the stool, ” a much-coveted position, surprisingly—Borman examines Tudor life in fine detail. England’s tudor monarchs—henry vii, edward vi, henry VIII, Mary I, and Elizabeth I—are perhaps the most celebrated and fascinating of all royal families in history.

The Private Lives of the Tudors: Uncovering the Secrets of Britain's Greatest Dynasty #ad - But for all we know about henry’s quest for male heirs, the lives of the Tudor monarchs away from the public eye remain largely beyond our grasp, or Elizabeth’s purported virginity, mostly not chronicled by previous historians. Their love affairs, their political triumphs, and their overturning of the religious order are the subject of countless works of popular scholarship.

In the private lives of the tudors, acclaimed historian Tracy Borman delves deep behind the public face of the monarchs, showing us what their lives were like beyond the stage of the court.

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The Life of Queen Elizabeth: The Virgin Queen Compass Monarchs

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Endeavour Compass #ad - Despite the spanish Ambassadors urging, Mary I refused to have her sister executed. Following a lung disorder, Edward VI died at the tender age of 15. He was merely a child at the time. On the 7th day of september, 1533, Elizabeth I was born. She was the daughter of Henry VIII and his second wife, Queen Anne Boleyn.

Queen elizabeth’s relationship with the Queen of Scots took a turn for the worse and Elizabeth had her detained. But mary i was able to depose her and became queen in 1553. Shortly after her succession, mary’s jealousy of Elizabeth I deepened and she ordered the imprisonment of Elizabeth as it was believed she was in engaged in a plot against Queen Mary I.

The Life of Queen Elizabeth: The Virgin Queen Compass Monarchs #ad - With this came several threats and assassination plots on Elizabeth’s life. In her early years as queen, she re-established the Reformed Church and announced that she would remain a virgin. Agnes strickland was a poet and historical writer. Under elizabeth’s reign, England prospered. Despite being branded illegitimate and the jealousy of her older sister, Mary I, Elizabeth enjoyed spending time playing and studying with her younger half-brother, Edward VI.

Despite the harsh and solitary conditions, Elizabeth I survived the confines of the Tower and rose up to become one of England's greatest monarchs. Elizabeth proceeded to reign for another forty-five years.

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The Forgotten Tudor Women: Anne Seymour, Jane Dudley & Elisabeth Parr

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#ad - Yet anne, jane and elisabeth lived through all this and left their indelible marks on history. Elisabeth parr, sister-in-law of Queen Katherine Parr, married for love and became Elizabeth I’s favourite lady-in-waiting. The tudor age was a hazardous time for ambitious women: courtly life exposed them to “pride, executions were part of everyday life, scorning and derision”, envy, indignation, death in childbirth was a real possibility and plagues sweeping regularly through the country could wipe out entire generations of families.

It’s high time for these women’s stories to be heard. Anne seymour, jane dudley and Elisabeth Parr all have their own unique stories to tell. Anne seymour served all of henry viii’s six wives and brushed with treason more than once, but she died in her bed as a wealthy old matriarch. Jane dudley was a wife and mother who fought for her family until her last breath.

The Forgotten Tudor Women: Anne Seymour, Jane Dudley & Elisabeth Parr #ad - . Born into the most turbulent period of england’s history, these women’s lives interplayed with the great dramas of the Tudor age, and their stories deserve to be told independently of their husbands.

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Rival Sisters: Mary & Elizabeth Tudor

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#ad - It is the relationship between elizabeth and her Scottish cousin Mary Stuart that is often discussed and pondered over while the relationship between Elizabeth and her own half sister is largely forgotten. I stood in danger of my life, my sister was so incensed against me, ” Elizabeth reminded her councillors when they pressed her to name a successor.

It is time to tell the whole story of the fierce rivalry between the Tudor half sisters who became their father’s successors. Yet it is the relationship with Mary Tudor that forged Elizabeth’s personality and set her on the path to queenship. Mary’s reign was the darkest period in Elizabeth’s life.

Rival Sisters: Mary & Elizabeth Tudor #ad - Partners both in throne and grave, here rest we two sisters Elizabeth and Mary, in the hope of one resurrection. This inscription is visible on the tomb where elizabeth I and her half sister, Mary I, lie buried together in one vault in the North Aisle of Henry VII’s Lady Chapel in Westminster Abbey.

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Queen Victoria: Her Life and Reign

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Endeavour Compass #ad - John castell hopkins 1854-1923 was born to British parents but grew up in Canada. Queen victoria’s influence reached beyond the boundaries of British-controlled regions and into virtually every country in Europe due to the fact that many of her nine children married into royal or noble European families.

These alliances created deep-seated links between the major powers of the late nineteenth century, opening lines of communication even during times of war. Queen Victoria. His suspicion of the United States and championing of British imperialism is apparent in much of his work. One of the most famous women in british history…the only daughter of Edward, Alexandrina Victoria became the heir-apparent to the English throne upon her father’s death and ascended the throne at the age of eighteen, Duke of Kent, in 1837.

At the time of her death, she had sixty-six direct descendants. John castell hopkins’s account of victoria’s life covers a wide range of material over the course of her six-decade reign, and the devastating premature loss of so many of her relations; as well as her political and diplomatic connections with Canada, South Africa, including her relationships with her beloved husband and many children and grandchildren, India, Australia, and the United States of America.

Queen Victoria: Her Life and Reign #ad - Her marriage to albert of saxe-coburg and gotha, generally considered a love match, was notable for Victoria’s desire to be a wife to her husband, even as she wielded the reins of enormous power in her position as Queen. Reigning for over sixty years victoria lent her name to a period of history that spanned nearly three-quarters of a century and saw marked change in England as well as around the world in industrial, scientific, political, cultural, and military matters.

As the ruler of the british Empire, Victoria played a role in the global domination of British interests in the nineteenth century.

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Great Ladies: The Forgotten Witnesses to the Lives of Tudor Queens

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#ad - There has been a great deal written about Tudor queens, but less so about those women who surrounded the throne, who may have held even more power and influence than those who actually wore the golden crown. Some ladies who served at the tudor court are only faceless silhouettes lost to the sands of time, but there are those who dedicated their lives to please their royal mistresses and left documentation, allowing us to piece their life stories together and link them to the stories of Tudor queens.

Some were beloved, others hated. This is the story of the ladies of the Tudor court like you’ve never read it before. These female attendants saw their queens and princesses up close and often used their intimate bonds to their own benefit.

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The Forgotten Tudor Women: Margaret Douglas, Mary Howard & Mary Shelton

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#ad - Beautiful and skilled in poetry, mary attracted henry VIII’s attention and became his mistress in 1535, but many don’t realize how important her contributions were to the literary scene of the time. She was imprisoned thrice, as she admitted, “not for matters of treason, and each time, but for love matters”.

Mary howard was the daughter of Thomas Howard, third Duke of Norfolk, leading peer of the Tudor court. Everyone knows that Henry VIII had six wives, two sisters and two daughters. Widowed at the age of seventeen, mary fought for her rightful jointure and was, by her father’s admission, “too wise for a woman”.

Mary shelton, like mary Howard, was related to Anne Boleyn and became her servant at court. She served as maid of honour to her first cousin, Henry Fitzroy, and married Henry VIII’s illegitimate but acknowledged son, Anne Boleyn, Duke of Richmond. All of these women received attention in academic circles and are the subjects of countless biographies.

The Forgotten Tudor Women: Margaret Douglas, Mary Howard & Mary Shelton #ad - Margaret douglas was the daughter of Henry VIII’s elder sister Margaret, Queen of Scotland. Not many people, who were close friends, however, a daughter-in-law and a mistress, realize that Henry VIII also had a niece, but who today remain on the fringes of history. This book moves margaret douglas, mary Howard and Mary Shelton from the footnotes of history into the spotlight, where they deserve to shine along with their more famous contemporaries.

Her legacy includes marrying her son to Mary, Queen of Scots, and playing the doting grandmother to King James VI and I.

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Tudor History: A Captivating Guide to the Tudors, the Wars of the Roses, the Six Wives of Henry VIII and the Life of Elizabeth I

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#ad - Some of the topics covered in part 1 of this book include:the tudors of walesthe wars of the rosescatherine of valois, queen of scotsand much more!some of the topics covered in part 2 of this book include:a short history of the house of plantagenetcivil war in franceengland’s loss and a king’s illnesstreason by the duke of yorkthe battle of northamptonmargaret’s armymortimer’s cross and the battle of towtonyork takes the thronethe king in the towerthe kingmaker repentsthe battles of barnet and tewkesburythe death of a kingthe final plantagenet kingsrichard iii and the Princes in the TowerThe Battle of BosworthThe Foundation of the Tudor DynastyAttempts on the Tudor ThroneThe Sainthood and Cult of King Henry VIThe Legacy of the Wars of the RosesAnd much, much more!Some of the topics covered in part 3 of this book include:Henry Tudor Catherine of AragonMistress Elizabeth BlountMistress Mary BoleynAnne BoleynAnne of ClevesMistress Mary SheltonThe Wooing of Jane SeymourCatherine HowardThe Culpeper AffairKatherine ParrMore Theories on Henry Tudor’s FertilityThe Illegitimate Children of Henry VIIIAnd much more!Some of the topics covered in part 4 of this book include:The Birth of a Future QueenFrom Princess to LadyElizabeth and the Royal StepmothersThe Teenaged PrincessA Flurry of SuccessionsQueen Elizabeth ISir Francis Drake and the Elizabethan SettlementsMary, Sister of Henry VIIIMary Tudor, Queen of Scots and War with SpainArts and Culture in Elizabethan EnglandThe End of the Tudor DynastyAnd much, Mother of the Tudor DynastyMargaret Beaufort, Jane GreyElizabeth TudorMary Stuart, Second Tudor MatriarchKing Henry VIIArthur TudorKing Henry VIIIMargaret Tudor, Queen of FranceThe Birth of the Church of EnglandKing Henry VIII: Wives Two and ThreeKing Henry VIII: The Last Three WivesKing Edward VIThe Nine Days’ Queen, much more!So if you want to learn more about Tudor history, click the "add to cart" button! .

The family earned their royal rights through strategic planning and battlefield prowess, and kept them because of intellect, strength and sheer determination. The tudors, knitted together a fragmented and small island nation that became one of the world’s financial, one of England’s most powerful and famous royal dynasties, colonial and technological superpowers.

Tudor History: A Captivating Guide to the Tudors, the Wars of the Roses, the Six Wives of Henry VIII and the Life of Elizabeth I #ad - There is so much more to the story of these kings and queens than beheadings, political marriages and the reformation of the church – but those events remain some of the family’s most enthralling moments. If you want to discover the captivating history of the Tudors, then keep reading.

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Woodvilles: The Wars of the Roses and England's Most Infamous Family

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The History Press #ad - This history includes little-known material such as private letters and wills. This is the story of the family whose fates would be inextricably intertwined with the fall of the plantagenets and the rise of the Tudors: Richard, the scholar and jouster who was one of Richard III's first victims; and Edward, mother to the queen and accused witch; Elizabeth, the squire whose marriage to a duchess would one day cost him his head; Jacquetta, the commoner whose royal destiny would cost her three of her sons; Anthony, whose military exploits would win him the admiration of Ferdinand and Isabella.

From an acclaimed historical fiction author comes the first nonfiction book on the notorious and perennially popular Woodville family, stunned the nation by revealing his secret marriage to Elizabeth Woodville, the most eligible bachelor in England, Edward IV,  investigating such controversial issues as the fate of the Princes in the Tower and witchcraft allegations against Elizabeth and her mother In 1464, a beautiful, impoverished widow whose father and brother Edward himself had once ridiculed as upstarts.

Woodvilles: The Wars of the Roses and England's Most Infamous Family #ad - . Edward's controversial match brought his queen's large family to court and into the thick of the Wars of the Roses.

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Elizabeth's Women: Friends, Rivals, and Foes Who Shaped the Virgin Queen

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Bantam #ad - A source of endless fascination and speculation, the subject of countless biographies, and films, novels, Elizabeth I is now considered from a thrilling new angle by the brilliant young historian Tracy Borman. Kat astley, the governess who attended and taught Elizabeth for almost thirty years, invited disaster by encouraging her charge into a dangerous liaison after Henry VIII’s death.

Mary tudor—“bloody mary”—envied her younger sister’s popularity and threatened to destroy her altogether. So often viewed in her relationships with men, the virgin Queen is portrayed here as the product of women—the mother she lost so tragically, raised, and the peers and intimates who loved, the female subjects who worshipped her, challenged, and sometimes opposed her.

Elizabeth's Women: Friends, Rivals, and Foes Who Shaped the Virgin Queen #ad - In vivid detail, borman presents elizabeth’s bewitching mother, Anne Boleyn, eager to nurture her new child, only to see her taken away and her own life destroyed by damning allegations—which taught Elizabeth never to mix politics and love. And animosity drove elizabeth and her cousin Mary Queen of Scots into an intense thirty-year rivalry that could end only in death.

Elizabeth’s Women contains more than an indelible cast of characters. It is an unprecedented account of how the public posture of femininity figured into the English court, the power of fecundity and flirtation, the meaning of costume and display, and how Elizabeth herself—long viewed as the embodiment of feminism—shared popular views of female inferiority and scorned and schemed against her underlings’ marriages and pregnancies.

Brilliantly researched and elegantly written, Elizabeth’s Women is a unique take on history’s most captivating queen and the dazzling court that surrounded her.  .

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Red Roses: Blanche of Gaunt to Margaret Beaufort

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The History Press #ad - There were daughters, wives, mistresses, mothers and queens whose lives and influences helped shape the most dramatic of English conflicts. From katherine swynford and catherine of valois's secret liaisons to the love lives of Mary de Bohun and Jacquetta of Luxembourg, to the Queenship of Joan of Navarre and Margaret of Anjou, this book explores how these extraordinary women survived in extraordinary times.

This book traces the women's stories on the lancastrian side, through the turbulent 15th century to the advent of Margaret Beaufort's son in 1509, from the children of Blanche, wife of John of Gaunt, and establishment of the Tudor dynasty. The wars of the Roses were not just fought by men on the battlefield.

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